please, do not feed the (inferno) artist

Thomas Halle:
Montreal-based part-time epicure, seriously occasional photographer, freelance visual effects artist and international man of procrastination.

This Tumblr here is my happy place of eternal ramblings, brain dump, inspirations, boobies, cats, pizza, all-purpose randomness and other reality-escaping shits, but still mainly nudity... But I do post some of my work here too.

I also made another Tumblr featuring exclusively my personal nude and portraits photography if you're interested.

I'm the admin/creator of Release The Crackwhore



Can also be found lurking over those places:
whoisthomashalle
flickr


Any questions?
Ask me then.




(Unless it's tagged as mine, I am not the author of all the other stuff. Copyrights belong to the original author, obviously. I link to original post or creator whenever possible.)
Designed by Redfield. Icons by Cameron Hunt.
Photograph

結婚不結婚 by ☀Solar ikon☀ on Flickr.

結婚不結婚 by ☀Solar ikon☀ on Flickr.



July 18, 2012, 5:52pm

Photograph

looping by ☀Solar ikon☀ on Flickr.

looping by ☀Solar ikon☀ on Flickr.



July 18, 2012, 11:48am

Photograph

Okinawa City 156.jpg by Cyclops-Optic on Flickr.

Okinawa City 156.jpg by Cyclops-Optic on Flickr.



July 17, 2012, 11:59am

Photograph

vector by hidden shine on Flickr.

vector by hidden shine on Flickr.



June 28, 2012, 5:57pm

Photograph

cultural-escapist:

urban abstraction by inferno artist on Flickr.


Reblogging my work on Tumblr…

cultural-escapist:

urban abstraction by inferno artist on Flickr.

Reblogging my work on Tumblr…

Reblogged from Cultural-Escapist.

March 21, 2012, 3:19pm

Photograph

Back in the 1920s, a tourist village was established along the shore of Lago Epecuen, a salt lake some 600 kilometers southwest of Buenos Aires, Argentina. The resort town, named Villa Epucuen, soon had a railroad station, and it thrived for several decades, peaking in the 1970s with a population of more than 5,000. Around the same time, a long-term weather event was delivering far more rain than usual to the surrounding hills for years, and Lago Epecuen began to swell. In 1985, the salty waters broke through an earthen dam, and Villa Epecuen was doomed. A slow-growing flood consumed the town until it reached a depth of 10 meters (33 feet) in 1993. The wet weather later reversed, and the waters began to recede in 2009. AFP photographer Juan Mabromata recently visited the ruins of Villa Epecuen, met its sole inhabitant, and returned with these images.

Back in the 1920s, a tourist village was established along the shore of Lago Epecuen, a salt lake some 600 kilometers southwest of Buenos Aires, Argentina. The resort town, named Villa Epucuen, soon had a railroad station, and it thrived for several decades, peaking in the 1970s with a population of more than 5,000. Around the same time, a long-term weather event was delivering far more rain than usual to the surrounding hills for years, and Lago Epecuen began to swell. In 1985, the salty waters broke through an earthen dam, and Villa Epecuen was doomed. A slow-growing flood consumed the town until it reached a depth of 10 meters (33 feet) in 1993. The wet weather later reversed, and the waters began to recede in 2009. AFP photographer Juan Mabromata recently visited the ruins of Villa Epecuen, met its sole inhabitant, and returned with these images.



August 18, 2011, 9:23pm