please, do not feed the (inferno) artist

Thomas Halle:
Montreal-based part-time epicure, seriously occasional photographer, freelance visual effects artist and international man of procrastination.



Recently made another Tumblr featuring entirely personal nude and portraits photography Tumblr over there if you're interested.


This Tumblr here is my happy place of eternal ramblings, brain dump, inspirations, boobies, cats, pizza, all-purpose randomness and other reality-escaping shits... But I do post some of my work here too.


Can also be found lurking over those places:
whoisthomashalle
flickr


Any questions?
Ask me then.




(Unless it's tagged as mine, I am not the author of all the other stuff. Copyrights belong to the original author, obviously. I link to original post or creator whenever possible.)
Designed by Redfield. Icons by Cameron Hunt.
Video

fotojournalismus:

In Memoriam: Anja Niedringhaus

Anja Niedringhaus, a courageous and immensely talented Associated Press photographer, was killed while covering elections in Afghanistan on April 4, 2014.

An Afghan police officer opened fire on Anja Niedringhaus and Kathy Gannon from the Associated Press in a police headquarters in Khost province, after the women arrived with a convoy of election materials on Friday.

Niedringhaus died almost immediately from wounds to her head, a health official said, and Gannon was taken to hospital with less serious injuries after being shot twice. She later underwent surgery and was described as being in stable condition and talking to medical personnel. Both were veteran correspondents with long experience covering Afghanistan.

Afghanistan, once a relatively safe place to work, has become increasingly deadly for journalists in the run up to the elections. Just last month Swedish-British radio reporter Nils Horner was shot dead in downtown Kabul. Days later Sardar Ahmad of the Agence France Press was gunned down, along with his wife and two children, in an attack on a luxury hotel in Kabul. His youngest son, two-year-old Abuzar, survived several gunshot wounds.

Niedringhaus has long been recognized for her expertise in gaining a subject’s trust and photographing them with a style that is immediately recognizable. Her attention to detail, composition and light come together to not only tell insightful stories but also to create works of art. 

She worked for the European Press Photo Agency before joining the AP in 2002, based in Geneva. She had published two books. She was the only woman on a team of 11 AP photographers awarded the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for breaking news photography.



Reblogged from fotojournalismus.

April 04, 2014, 4:12pm

Photograph

guardian:

Scale of suffering at Syrian refugee camp is revealed by photo of huge queue for food
Aid is distributed at the Yarmouk camp in Damascus, where the UN says people have been reduced to eating animal feed. Since the photograph was taken, aid has ceased to be delivered because of security concerns. 
Photographer: UNRWA/AP

guardian:

Scale of suffering at Syrian refugee camp is revealed by photo of huge queue for food

Aid is distributed at the Yarmouk camp in Damascus, where the UN says people have been reduced to eating animal feed. Since the photograph was taken, aid has ceased to be delivered because of security concerns. 

Photographer: UNRWA/AP



Reblogged from The Guardian.

March 05, 2014, 6:00pm

Video

fotojournalismus:

In the Land of Niger

When France began mining uranium ore in the desert of northern Niger in the early 1970s, Arlit was a cluster of miners’ huts stranded between the sun-blasted rocks of the Air mountains and the sands of the Sahara.

The 1973 OPEC oil embargo changed that. France embraced nuclear power to free itself from reliance on foreign oil and overnight this remote corner of Africa became crucial to its national interests. Arlit has grown into a sprawling settlement of 117,000 people, while France now depends on nuclear power for three-quarters of its electricity, making it more reliant on uranium than any country on earth.

Niger has become the world’s fourth-largest producer of the ore after Kazakhstan, Canada and Australia. But uranium has not enriched Niger. The former French colony remains one of the poorest countries on earth. More than 60 percent of its 17 million people survive on less than $1 a day. — Read More

(Photographs: Joe Penney/Reuters)



Reblogged from fotojournalismus.

February 16, 2014, 7:38pm

Photograph

fotojournalismus:

Afghan baby, Lalah, lies on the floor inside a tent at a refugee camp on the outskirts of Mazar-i-Sharif on January 31, 2014. (Farshad Usyan/AFP/Getty Images)

fotojournalismus:

Afghan baby, Lalah, lies on the floor inside a tent at a refugee camp on the outskirts of Mazar-i-Sharif on January 31, 2014. (Farshad Usyan/AFP/Getty Images)



Reblogged from fotojournalismus.

February 14, 2014, 9:49pm

Video

5centsapound:

Carolyn Drake: Two Rivers

In this project, the Amu Darya and Syr Darya – two rivers – become guides on a journey through Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, and Tajikistan.

Background:

Early Islamic writings call the Amu and Syr Darya two of the four rivers of Paradise. Their water has sustained human life for forty thousand years, providing pastures for nomadic herders and irrigation for farmers, enabling the development of culture, trade, language, literature—and, in parallel, motivating a centuries-long succession of wars and imperial conquests. Turkic, Mongol, Hun, and Wu Hu nomadic warriors from the mountains fought settled farmers in the valleys and desert oases until the sixteenth century, before the conquests of the Qing dynasty and the British and Russian empires.

When the Soviet government officially incorporated Central Asia in 1917, it carved the land up into independent republics and transformed its rivers into a web of irrigation canals, turning the region into a gigantic cotton farm. Such large quantities of water were diverted that the Aral Sea, once the world’s fourth largest lake, began to disappear, replaced by salt and dust storms. When Moscow’s rule ended in 1991, five new Central Asian nations were left behind, burdened with struggling economies, artificial borders, and a growing environmental crisis.

Despite the divisions that have emerged since the collapse of the Soviet Union, the two rivers still run through these countries, binding them inextricably. This project follows the rivers from beginning to end, crossing into the lives of people and the layers of history that they intersect along the way.



Reblogged from Dark Silence In Suburbia.

February 08, 2014, 7:38pm

Video

glasmond:

A new set for an apocalypse movie? 
No.
The riots in Kiev. This is happening right now.

Those breathtaking pictures were taken by the young and usually happy tumblarian girl RedMisa during her volunteer work at Kiev.

"I never thought that I would cry for my native country. I’m not particularly patriotic, I do not like politics, large gatherings of people, meetings and inspirational slogans. but I still go to the central street of Kyiv almost every day, doing volunteer work, doing all I can to help. two months of no change for the better, things were getting worse and worse. but when the killings began, catching the protesters in the streets and beating them up…that was the last straw for me. I do not know what to expect next."

- RedMisa, http://redmisa.tumblr.com/

The Ukraine probably won’t have access to the internet soon. Read more about it here.



Reblogged from apocalypsechic.

January 26, 2014, 4:18pm

Video

fotojournalismus:

Benjamin Rasmussen: The Wakhan Corridor

The Wakhan Corridor, located in the northeastern corner of Afghanistan, is unlike anyplace else in the country. The two people groups who reside in the region live in isolation from the outside world; with the Kyrgyz living on the high peaks of the Pamir Mountains, and the Wakhi in the valleys bellow. With little interaction with foreign forces or the Taliban, it is an area that exists outside of the turmoil of the rest of the Afghanistan.

(via 5centsapound)



Reblogged from fotojournalismus.

December 30, 2013, 3:25am

Video

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Kuba Rubaj. Rainbow/ The Road

Rainbow Gathering is like alternative to modern world. Each year Rainbow Family attracts hundreds of thousands of people to spend time in wilderness.
Gatherings each year take place at over 100 locations all over the world, away from civilization, shops, sanitation, electricity, telephones, Internet, alcohol, drugs, money.

Participants feel connection with nature. They wish to live in peace and harmony. Some of them consider Rainbow as a new form of society. Spiritually, there is a very strong influence from native North American Shamanism. There is no membership, leaders, official spokespersons or any formal structure, everyone is equal. They live like a tribe.

All decisions are made by mutual consent achieved by discussion in the circle. Meals are common, and all duties voluntary. Each gathering lasts for a month or longer. There are also rainbow villages - small societies which try to be self-sufficient, usually hidden in mountains. I visited one, called Beneficio in Sierra Nevada Mountains in Spain.

Everything may sounds a bit utopian but it actually works. Each year rainbow gatherings is visited by more and more people.

During four years I visited eight countries in four continents: Brazil, Turkey, Sahara desert in Morocco, Finland, Spain - twice, Poland, Ukraine. I travelled by many ways, a lot by hitch-hiking. With time photographs of the road I took began writing story in itself. I wish to visit all continents, and make two books about Raibow and the Road. Work is still in progress.

Website



Reblogged from Dark Silence In Suburbia.

December 27, 2013, 3:25am

Video

fotojournalismus:

Arnau Bach is a self-taught photojournalist currently based out of Barcelona, Spain. In Bach’s series, entitled “Suburbia”, he ventures into Clichy Sous Bois, a suburb north of Paris, France where in November 2005 Zyed Benna (15 years old) and Bouna Traore (17 years old) died after being electrocuted by an electric generator while hiding from police in their neighborhood. In a matter of days, suburbs surrounding Paris would erupt in flames from violent protests from the disenfranchised communities of color outraged from the death of the two teens. | Via Empty Kingdom

(via elisebrown)



Reblogged from fotojournalismus.

December 05, 2013, 9:20pm

Video

fotojournalismus:

Bruce Davidson - East 100th Street

"For two years in the 1960s, Bruce Davidson photographed one block in East Harlem. He went back day after day, standing on sidewalks, knocking on doors, asking permission to photograph a face, a child, a room, a family. Through his skill, his extraordinary vision, and his deep respect for his subjects, Davidson’s portrait of the people of East 100th Street is a powerful statement of the dignity and humanity that is in all people."

(via likeafieldmouse)



Reblogged from fotojournalismus.

December 05, 2013, 1:20pm

Photograph

newyorker:

In this week’s issue, Ian Johnson writes about Handan, one of the ten most polluted cities in China: http://nyr.kr/17W9JhL
The photographer Sim Chi Yin travelled to Handan to document the pollution. A look at the photos: http://nyr.kr/17W9Ny2
Photograph by Sim Chi Yin/VII.

newyorker:

In this week’s issue, Ian Johnson writes about Handan, one of the ten most polluted cities in China: http://nyr.kr/17W9JhL

The photographer Sim Chi Yin travelled to Handan to document the pollution. A look at the photos: http://nyr.kr/17W9Ny2

Photograph by Sim Chi Yin/VII.



Reblogged from The New Yorker.

December 05, 2013, 10:40am

Video

bobbycaputo:

SYRIA’S LOST GENERATION

in August. Of the millions of Syrians displaced by the civil war, Dorfman was drawn most strongly to the teen-agers. “They seemed particularly shell-shocked and bereft,” she said. “They spoke to me of powerful longing and frustration.”

(Continue Reading)



Reblogged from Dark Silence In Suburbia.

November 25, 2013, 9:20pm

Photograph

fotojournalismus:

An unexploded molotov cocktail burns next to a riot police armored personnel carrier in the village of Selah west of Manama, September 4, 2013. Protesters clashed with riot police after a funeral procession of Sadeq Sabt in Selah. Sabt died on September 1 from injuries caused when a car hit him while he was trying to create road-blocks in the village by burning tires on the road on July 30, 2013, according to media reports.
[Credit : Hamad I Mohammed/Reuters]

fotojournalismus:

An unexploded molotov cocktail burns next to a riot police armored personnel carrier in the village of Selah west of Manama, September 4, 2013. Protesters clashed with riot police after a funeral procession of Sadeq Sabt in Selah. Sabt died on September 1 from injuries caused when a car hit him while he was trying to create road-blocks in the village by burning tires on the road on July 30, 2013, according to media reports.

[Credit : Hamad I Mohammed/Reuters]



Reblogged from fotojournalismus.

September 27, 2013, 9:14am

Photograph

abandonedography:

"A fisherman passes a shipwreck near the port of Greenville, Liberia. In the mid 1990s, a vessel arrived carrying an aid cargo of rice and fuel. The captain and crew left the ship when it developed a problem and was in danger of sinking. They returned the next day to find that the whole cargo had disappeared and the ship had been ravaged". 
Photo by Tim Hetherington

abandonedography:

"A fisherman passes a shipwreck near the port of Greenville, Liberia. In the mid 1990s, a vessel arrived carrying an aid cargo of rice and fuel. The captain and crew left the ship when it developed a problem and was in danger of sinking. They returned the next day to find that the whole cargo had disappeared and the ship had been ravaged". 

Photo by Tim Hetherington



Reblogged from Abandonedography.

September 26, 2013, 10:26am

Photograph

fotojournalismus:

nationalpostphotos:
A Palestinian protester throws a stone towards an Israeli military bulldozer during clashes following a demonstration against the expropriation of Palestinian land by Israel on August 30, 2013, in the village of Kfar Qaddum, near the occupied West Bank city of Nablus.(JAAFAR ASHTIYEH/AFP/Getty Images)

fotojournalismus:

nationalpostphotos:

A Palestinian protester throws a stone towards an Israeli military bulldozer during clashes following a demonstration against the expropriation of Palestinian land by Israel on August 30, 2013, in the village of Kfar Qaddum, near the occupied West Bank city of Nablus.(JAAFAR ASHTIYEH/AFP/Getty Images)



Reblogged from fotojournalismus.

September 22, 2013, 8:19pm