please, do not feed the (inferno) artist

Thomas Halle:
Montreal-based part-time epicure, seriously occasional photographer, freelance visual effects artist and international man of procrastination.

This Tumblr here is my happy place of eternal ramblings, brain dump, inspirations, boobies, cats, pizza, all-purpose randomness and other reality-escaping shits, but still mainly nudity... But I do post some of my work here too.

I also made another Tumblr featuring exclusively my personal nude and portraits photography if you're interested.

I'm the admin/creator of Release The Crackwhore



Can also be found lurking over those places:
whoisthomashalle
flickr


Any questions?
Ask me then.




(Unless it's tagged as mine, I am not the author of all the other stuff. Copyrights belong to the original author, obviously. I link to original post or creator whenever possible.)
Designed by Redfield. Icons by Cameron Hunt.
Photograph

reportagebygettyimages:

'I was with my colleague friend Manon Querouil doing a story on oil companies who are destroying the Niger Delta and rebels who are attacking pipe-lines and kidnapping people. The rebels, known as the Movement of Emancipation of the Niger Delta, and Ateke, their chief, were living hidden in the mangrove….After a few days Ateke fancies Manon and wants to sleep with her. I had to play the big sister role, saying that she can not, she would have to be married. Warlord says fine, he will marry Manon – what’s another wife or two. We said to him that we needed beautiful dresses, a ring and to all our parents. Ateke gave us some money and send a man with us so we can buy our girl things. Of course as soon as we arrived into the city we flew back to France. Ateke is probably still waiting for his evaporated wife.'
-Reportage by Getty Images photographer Veronique de Viguerie recalls the story behind one her most iconic photos -  Escaping a Marriage Proposal from a Warlord

reportagebygettyimages:

'I was with my colleague friend Manon Querouil doing a story on oil companies who are destroying the Niger Delta and rebels who are attacking pipe-lines and kidnapping people. The rebels, known as the Movement of Emancipation of the Niger Delta, and Ateke, their chief, were living hidden in the mangrove….After a few days Ateke fancies Manon and wants to sleep with her. I had to play the big sister role, saying that she can not, she would have to be married. Warlord says fine, he will marry Manon – what’s another wife or two. We said to him that we needed beautiful dresses, a ring and to all our parents. Ateke gave us some money and send a man with us so we can buy our girl things. Of course as soon as we arrived into the city we flew back to France. Ateke is probably still waiting for his evaporated wife.'

-Reportage by Getty Images photographer Veronique de Viguerie recalls the story behind one her most iconic photos -  Escaping a Marriage Proposal from a Warlord



Reblogged from .

September 04, 2014, 9:41am

Video

reportagebygettyimages:

"What are the advantages of using an iPhone?"

Photojournalist Benjamin Lowy talks to Richard Aedy, of the Australian Broadcasting Company Radio Network, about the virtues of using a mobile phone in the field. In the above video, Lowy, who has made mobile-phone images while working in Libya, Afghanistan, and his own backyard of New York City, explains how he chooses the right tool for the job. As for the question above, Lowy says:

When you shoot with an SLR or rangefinder or any type of camera, you’re taking this huge black box and throwing it in front of your face. And you’re blocking out your ability to interact with your subject. Sometimes that can be good if you need if you need to cut your empathy off, so like if you’re at a funeral and you need to pull yourself emotionally out of a situation. But a lot of times I’m just talking to someone out on the street, and all of the sudden I am cutting the level of empathy and the level of interaction and intimacy with people by putting a camera against your face. So by using the phone I can keep eye contact with the people I’m photographing.

Hear more segments from ABC RN’s ‘Media Report’ on the show’s website.



Reblogged from .

September 01, 2014, 1:49pm

Video

fotojournalismus:

Israeli Airstrike Topples Minaret of Gaza Mosque | July 30, 2014

Photos by Oliver Weiken/EPA, Lefteris Pitarakis/AP, Mahmud Hams/AFP/Getty Images.



Reblogged from fotojournalismus.

August 10, 2014, 2:24pm

Photograph

fotojournalismus:

Israeli forces’ flares light up the night sky of Gaza City on early July 29, 2014. (Khalil Hamra/AP)

fotojournalismus:

Israeli forces’ flares light up the night sky of Gaza City on early July 29, 2014. (Khalil Hamra/AP)



Reblogged from fotojournalismus.

July 30, 2014, 2:29pm

Video

fotojournalismus:

Boat Migrants Risk Everything for a New Life in Europe

Eight months after a boat carrying hundreds of migrants sank off the coast of Lampedusa, killing more than 360 people and spurring an international outcry, the flow of migrants risking the perilous sea journey to Europe shows no signs of letting up. Already this year, the number of migrants arriving by boat on Italy’s shores has surpassed 40,000, the total number of migrants that arrived in 2013. 

On World Refugee Day, June 20, TIME is publishing a collection of images from photographer Massimo Sestini, who accompanied the Italian navy on its rescue missions earlier this month. The shots depict the treacherous conditions in which tens of thousands of migrants and refugees attempt the crossing, packed in rickety motorboats with limited supplies. But they also reveal, in a manner rarely seen, the human faces of some of the men, women and children who risk everything to make it to Europe.



Reblogged from fotojournalismus.

June 20, 2014, 11:41am

Photograph

fotojournalismus:

A Palestinian boy looks through the shattered window of a car that witnesses said was damaged in an Israeli airstrike in Gaza City on June 16, 2014. (Ashraf Amra/APA Images/Zuma Press)

fotojournalismus:

A Palestinian boy looks through the shattered window of a car that witnesses said was damaged in an Israeli airstrike in Gaza City on June 16, 2014. (Ashraf Amra/APA Images/Zuma Press)



Reblogged from fotojournalismus.

June 18, 2014, 9:47am

Video

policymic:

Life inside Caracas’ unfinished skyscraper Centro Financiero Confinanzas, the world’s tallest slum

It was meant to be world financial center and the third-tallest building in all of Venezuela, known for its sprawling cities and staggering inequality. But in 1994, construction was halted on the building after four years thanks to a banking crisis that saw 17 of the nation’s 49 commercial banks fail. Over time, the abandoned building was colonized by squatters from nearby slums. Today, the tower is the world’s largest vertical slum — dubbed “Torre David,” or “Tower of David,” by residents — the structure hosts a self-contained community of roughly 3,000 people in over 750 families spanning 45 floors, each with their own shops and services. Residents pay a $32 monthly condo fee for 24-hour armed security and run a co-operative mini-government, with non-compliance for the rules being punished with “social work” like chores and repairs around the building.

Read more | Follow policymic



Reblogged from Mic.

April 28, 2014, 11:04am

Video

How do people adapt to life in one of the most polluted cities in the world, in sub-zero temperatures, during extended periods with no daylight?

Photographer Elena Chernyshova recently set out to explore those questions in Norilsk, Russia, a city of more than 170,000 people located above the polar circle.

http://proof.nationalgeographic.com/2014/01/06/russians-adapt-to-a-freezing-dark-and-polluted-place/



April 22, 2014, 3:25am

Video

fotojournalismus:

In Memoriam: Anja Niedringhaus

Anja Niedringhaus, a courageous and immensely talented Associated Press photographer, was killed while covering elections in Afghanistan on April 4, 2014.

An Afghan police officer opened fire on Anja Niedringhaus and Kathy Gannon from the Associated Press in a police headquarters in Khost province, after the women arrived with a convoy of election materials on Friday.

Niedringhaus died almost immediately from wounds to her head, a health official said, and Gannon was taken to hospital with less serious injuries after being shot twice. She later underwent surgery and was described as being in stable condition and talking to medical personnel. Both were veteran correspondents with long experience covering Afghanistan.

Afghanistan, once a relatively safe place to work, has become increasingly deadly for journalists in the run up to the elections. Just last month Swedish-British radio reporter Nils Horner was shot dead in downtown Kabul. Days later Sardar Ahmad of the Agence France Press was gunned down, along with his wife and two children, in an attack on a luxury hotel in Kabul. His youngest son, two-year-old Abuzar, survived several gunshot wounds.

Niedringhaus has long been recognized for her expertise in gaining a subject’s trust and photographing them with a style that is immediately recognizable. Her attention to detail, composition and light come together to not only tell insightful stories but also to create works of art. 

She worked for the European Press Photo Agency before joining the AP in 2002, based in Geneva. She had published two books. She was the only woman on a team of 11 AP photographers awarded the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for breaking news photography.



Reblogged from fotojournalismus.

April 04, 2014, 4:12pm

Photograph

guardian:

Scale of suffering at Syrian refugee camp is revealed by photo of huge queue for food
Aid is distributed at the Yarmouk camp in Damascus, where the UN says people have been reduced to eating animal feed. Since the photograph was taken, aid has ceased to be delivered because of security concerns. 
Photographer: UNRWA/AP

guardian:

Scale of suffering at Syrian refugee camp is revealed by photo of huge queue for food

Aid is distributed at the Yarmouk camp in Damascus, where the UN says people have been reduced to eating animal feed. Since the photograph was taken, aid has ceased to be delivered because of security concerns. 

Photographer: UNRWA/AP



Reblogged from The Guardian.

March 05, 2014, 6:00pm

Video

fotojournalismus:

In the Land of Niger

When France began mining uranium ore in the desert of northern Niger in the early 1970s, Arlit was a cluster of miners’ huts stranded between the sun-blasted rocks of the Air mountains and the sands of the Sahara.

The 1973 OPEC oil embargo changed that. France embraced nuclear power to free itself from reliance on foreign oil and overnight this remote corner of Africa became crucial to its national interests. Arlit has grown into a sprawling settlement of 117,000 people, while France now depends on nuclear power for three-quarters of its electricity, making it more reliant on uranium than any country on earth.

Niger has become the world’s fourth-largest producer of the ore after Kazakhstan, Canada and Australia. But uranium has not enriched Niger. The former French colony remains one of the poorest countries on earth. More than 60 percent of its 17 million people survive on less than $1 a day. — Read More

(Photographs: Joe Penney/Reuters)



Reblogged from fotojournalismus.

February 16, 2014, 7:38pm

Photograph

fotojournalismus:

Afghan baby, Lalah, lies on the floor inside a tent at a refugee camp on the outskirts of Mazar-i-Sharif on January 31, 2014. (Farshad Usyan/AFP/Getty Images)

fotojournalismus:

Afghan baby, Lalah, lies on the floor inside a tent at a refugee camp on the outskirts of Mazar-i-Sharif on January 31, 2014. (Farshad Usyan/AFP/Getty Images)



Reblogged from fotojournalismus.

February 14, 2014, 9:49pm

Video

5centsapound:

Carolyn Drake: Two Rivers

In this project, the Amu Darya and Syr Darya – two rivers – become guides on a journey through Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, and Tajikistan.

Background:

Early Islamic writings call the Amu and Syr Darya two of the four rivers of Paradise. Their water has sustained human life for forty thousand years, providing pastures for nomadic herders and irrigation for farmers, enabling the development of culture, trade, language, literature—and, in parallel, motivating a centuries-long succession of wars and imperial conquests. Turkic, Mongol, Hun, and Wu Hu nomadic warriors from the mountains fought settled farmers in the valleys and desert oases until the sixteenth century, before the conquests of the Qing dynasty and the British and Russian empires.

When the Soviet government officially incorporated Central Asia in 1917, it carved the land up into independent republics and transformed its rivers into a web of irrigation canals, turning the region into a gigantic cotton farm. Such large quantities of water were diverted that the Aral Sea, once the world’s fourth largest lake, began to disappear, replaced by salt and dust storms. When Moscow’s rule ended in 1991, five new Central Asian nations were left behind, burdened with struggling economies, artificial borders, and a growing environmental crisis.

Despite the divisions that have emerged since the collapse of the Soviet Union, the two rivers still run through these countries, binding them inextricably. This project follows the rivers from beginning to end, crossing into the lives of people and the layers of history that they intersect along the way.



Reblogged from Dark Silence In Suburbia.

February 08, 2014, 7:38pm

Video

glasmond:

A new set for an apocalypse movie? 
No.
The riots in Kiev. This is happening right now.

Those breathtaking pictures were taken by the young and usually happy tumblarian girl RedMisa during her volunteer work at Kiev.

"I never thought that I would cry for my native country. I’m not particularly patriotic, I do not like politics, large gatherings of people, meetings and inspirational slogans. but I still go to the central street of Kyiv almost every day, doing volunteer work, doing all I can to help. two months of no change for the better, things were getting worse and worse. but when the killings began, catching the protesters in the streets and beating them up…that was the last straw for me. I do not know what to expect next."

- RedMisa, http://redmisa.tumblr.com/

The Ukraine probably won’t have access to the internet soon. Read more about it here.



Reblogged from apocalypsechic.

January 26, 2014, 4:18pm

Video

fotojournalismus:

Benjamin Rasmussen: The Wakhan Corridor

The Wakhan Corridor, located in the northeastern corner of Afghanistan, is unlike anyplace else in the country. The two people groups who reside in the region live in isolation from the outside world; with the Kyrgyz living on the high peaks of the Pamir Mountains, and the Wakhi in the valleys bellow. With little interaction with foreign forces or the Taliban, it is an area that exists outside of the turmoil of the rest of the Afghanistan.

(via 5centsapound)



Reblogged from fotojournalismus.

December 30, 2013, 3:25am